• What is Nordic Skiing? 

    Nordic skiing or otherwise known as cross country skiing is racing on skis across rolling terrain. It is a MSHSL sanctioned varsity sport with its season running from generally from November to February.  Nordic skiing is also the best sport on the planet.

    Who can sign up for the team?

    Any 7th through 12th grade boy or girl at Edina schools can sign up.

    Do I have to know how to ski?

    No ski experience is required.  What is required is the willingness to learn and to put in the time to practice.

    Does everyone make the team?

    Yes, Nordic skiing is a no-cut sport although active participation is required.  Everyone that is not on varsity will be on junior varsity.  Many of the meets will be for both varsity and junior varsity skiers.

    In order to be good, do I need to have skied most of my life?

    Definitely no, as there have been skiers that have made varsity their first year.  Last year’s boys state winner was never on skis until 9th grade, and the same was true for most of the members of the winning boys team.

    What types of athletes are good at Nordic skiing?

    Nordic skiing requires a combination of coordination, strength, and endurance.  All different types of athletes do well as Nordic skiers, including, but not limited to: runners, swimmers, soccer players, cyclists, and ex-hockey players. We have a number of high quality skiers on the team where Nordic skiing is their only sport.

    Where do we practice?

    Most practices are at the high school.  The team has snowmaking equipment, so if the weather is cold enough there will be snow.

    Don’t you get cold skiing?

    Not really. Cold weather only tends to be a problem for parents coming to watch meets.  Skiers generate a lot of heat skiing and cold weather is rarely an issue.

    Where are the races?

    Races are usually at Three Rivers parks, including HylandElm CreekBaker, and Murphy-Hanrehan; and at Theodore Wirth Park.

    What are races like?

    Races are usually five kilometers (3.1 miles) long.  There are occasionally junior varsity races that are shorter.  Races will be either designated skating or classic skiing races. Typically, a skier will start out in a group of 2 – 4 skiers with each group starting at 15 second intervals.

    Skating and classic skiing?

    There are two types of skiing techniques: classic skiing which is the diagonal stride skiing and skating which is the skate stride technique.  A different set of skis and poles are used for each technique.

    Do I have to learn both techniques?

    Actually, beginning junior varsity skiers can choose to race using either skating or classic skiing. Most beginning junior varsity skiers will elect to skate over classic ski.  They prefer skating because it is faster and they don’t have to deal with applying kick wax on classic skis.  Varsity skiers will need to ski both techniques, so it is advantageous for beginning skiers to learn both techniques as soon as they can.

    Does the school have ski equipment that I can use?

    The team has a very limited number of skis that it has available for loan. Most skiers will have to buy their own skis and virtually everyone will need to buy their own pair of ski boots. 

    Is ski equipment expensive?

    Yes, but there are ways to mitigate the cost.  A new set of racing ski equipment (2 skis: classic and skate; 2 sets of poles: classic and skate; one pair of combi boots: used for both classic and skate) begin at around $600. Here are ways to reduce your equipment cost:

     ·     Always be sure to ask for the high school team discount, as most ski shops do offer a discount for members of high school Nordic teams.

    ·     Buy only one set of skis.  Beginning skiers may want to only get a pair of skate skis and poles.  If they continue with skiing they can get classic skis the next year.  Older (10th– 12th grade) beginning skiers that want to experience both ski techniques may want to get a pair of combi skis that can be used for both skating and classic. 

    ·     Buy used equipment.  There are a handful of local ski swaps that sell Nordic equipment.  The best sources of used equipment are your neighbors and friends that have had kids in Nordic skiing.

    ·     Buy older model equipment.  Ski shops will have new equipment from one, two, or more years ago that will be less expensive.

    ·     Consider that the seller market for equipment is very good.  The demand for used ski equipment is much greater than the supply. If you re-sell your equipment, you will get back a significant portion of what you paid for it.

     

    Sounds good so far, but can you give me more information?

    Watch this Edina Nordic team video to give you a better idea of what the team is about.
     

    How do I register?

    Registration period for Nordic skiing generally occurs around late October to early November.  Go to Edina Activities and Athletics Registration to register and get more details about registering.  It is a recommended to register early, especially if this is the student’s first time registering for a sport.   There are required health forms that may take some time to complete. Your credit card is not charged for the registration fee until the first week of the season.  Be sure to include your email addresses when filling out the registration, as email is the main method of communication about the team. Remember your registration is not complete until you have picked up your participation pass at the EHS Activities Office.

    What if I have more questions?

    If you have any questions or want to get added to the Edina Nordic email list, send email to edinanordicski@gmail.com.

    Is Nordic skiing really the best sport on the planet?

    Yes, here’s why

    ·     Students must like Nordic skiing as we had around 200 athletes last year, making it the largest team at Edina.

    ·     Nordic skiers are the fittest athletes in the world  (google VO2 max fittest athletes).

    ·     Skiing is great training, its motion uses every major muscle group.

    ·     Admittedly not the greatest spectator sport, but it is still very fun to watch (Check out this race from the 2013 World Championship).

    ·     It’s a low impact exercise that is a lifetime sport.

    ·     Skiing gets you outside instead of being stuck inside all winter.

    ·     A sport that the entire family can enjoy together (Read this story from Edina Magazine).

    ·     Ski trails are located in beautiful natural settings.

    ·     It is a lot of fun!